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Posts Tagged ‘Freen Monster’

And sweep we clearly did not.  Although we obviously should have, being that it’s Baltimore and all, which makes it so much worse.  At least we split.  It was a day of opposites.

Kyle Weiland started and did not have anything close to resembling a good day.  He cruised through the first two innings with one of the better cutters I’ve seen from him and then all of a sudden everything went wrong both in the field and on the mound.  He threw eighty-five pitches through four and two-thirds innings.  Fifty-two of those were strikes; he walked two and struck out five.  He gave up six runs, five earned, on five hits.  Only two of the runs he gave up did not score via the home run.  Yup.  You read right.  He gave up three: a two-runner and two solo shots.  And you can thank McDonald’s sun-induced fielding error in the third for that unearned run.  Doubront and Aceves combined for a scoreless rest of the game after that.

We did our best to battle back.  I guess McDonald really felt bad about that error because he led off the bottom of the frame with a solo shot on the second pitch of the at-bat, a fastball that he promptly sent into the Monster seats.  We got another run back in the fourth on Salty’s RBI triple.  And we got two back in the fifth with the progression of Scutaro’s walk, Gonzalez’s RBI double, and Pedroia’s RBI triple.  Scutaro’s double and Gonzalez’s single combined to bring in another in the seventh for what would be our last run in a 6-5 loss.  Oh, and by the way, that foul ball that Papi hit in the fifth wasn’t foul at all.  It was fair.  It was fair by a mile.  The worst part is that it wasn’t a potential home run, so it couldn’t be reviewed.  But it was fair, and it made the difference.  He went on to fly out, although that ball was almost out too.  Did I mention that Jeremy Guthrie leads the American League in losses? There’s no way it should even have come to that.

Lackey started and did not have anything close to resembling a good day, either.  The difference was that the offense turned itself on in a big way.  Without that, the O’s would have embarrassed us completely.  Lackey lasted four and a third innings and gave up eight runs on eleven hits.  He walked two and struck out three.  He threw 105 pitches, seventy-five of which were strikes.  It was Atchison who relieved him and picked up the win.  Morales allowed another run, and then Albers and Bowden finished the game scoreless.

Let’s get to the good stuff.  The O’s may have put up a three-spot in the top of the first, but we answered with a four-spot in the bottom of the inning.  Pedroia brought in one on a groundout, and then Lowrie unleashed on the eighth straight four-seam he saw in his first at-bat for a three-run shot.  He also put it in the Monster seats.  It stayed just fair and got out of the park in a hurry.  We added two more in the second; Scutaro doubled in one (had McDonald not been out at home, it would have been two), and Pedroia stroked an RBI single.  We busted it open in the third with a five-spot.  McDonald started the scoring plays with an RBI single and a little help from a bad throw.  Ellsbury doubled him, and he scored on a single by Scutaro.  Pedroia and Papi brought in two more with back-to-back RBI singles.

But if you thought that that inning was big, it was nothing compared to the seventh, when we put up a seven-spot.  Seven runs in seven innings.  We scored more runs in that one inning alone than we have in some of our games recently.  The highlight was the first to occur.  Ellsbury led it off.  He took a fastball for a ball, fouled off another, and took a changeup for a ball.  Another changeup made the count 2-2.  And then it happened: a rare result of the perfect combination of hitting and speed, a manifestation of skill and luck.

Jacoby Ellsbury hit an inside-the-park home run.

It was the first on the team since Youk did it on May 28, 2007.  I saw it and I couldn’t believe it.  It was perfect.  It’s one of those things that you always imagine in your head, trying to draft the perfect conditions under which something like this would result and then hoping you’ll see it but assuming you won’t.  It’s the triple play of offense.  And he executed it without a flaw.

The ball sailed out to center field.  It bounced off of the top of the bullpen wall sharply at some sort of strange angle and ricocheted out to center field.  The outfielders couldn’t get to it in time; meanwhile, Ellsbury had his head down and put the pedal to the metal.  He was safe with some time to spare.

And then Lowrie hit an RBI single.  And then Conor Jackson hit a grand slam on a fastball, which he also put into the Monster seats.  It was the first time we’ve ever had an inside-the-park home run and a grand slam in the same game.  And then we were done.  No big deal.  The final score was 18-9.

As a result, the whole doubleheader was a surreal experience.  I felt like I was watching two different teams in the two different games.

In other news, the Pats made the Chargers look like amateurs.  The final score was 35-21.  This is going to be a truly fantastic season.

Boston Globe Staff/Jim Davis
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