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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Carpenter’

Honestly, it doesn’t get much more infuriating than that.  I’m just going to jump right in because it’s really tough to deal with it all.

Cook pitched decently.  He only lasted five innings, and he gave up three runs on seven hits while walking none and striking out two.  He went one-two-three in the first and second, and gave up a double in the third.  He gave up a solo shot to lead off the fourth followed by a single and then a two-run home run.  Following  two quick outs, he gave up a single, and then a fielding error put another runner on, but the inning ended there.  He allowed a single in the fifth and a double to lead off the sixth, at which point he was replaced by Hill, who was replaced by Aceves after three batters.

Meanwhile, we reduced our deficit from three runs to two; in the bottom of the fourth, Pedroia doubled with one out and scored on a single by Loney.

Aceves came out for the seventh and gave up a single followed by a two-run home run of his own, which made the score 5-1.  Two outs later, he gave up a double and was replaced by Carpenter, who ended the inning.  In the bottom of the seventh, we made another dent in the score.  Ross began the inning by striking out, but then Salty and Nava hit back-to-back doubles.  The Yanks sent out their third pitcher of the inning, and then Salty scored on a groundout by Gomez and Nava scored on a double by Aviles.  5-3.

Carpenter handled the eighth without incident baseball-wise but with incident drama-wise; when Bobby V. came out to the mound and Aceves saw Carpenter coming in, he walked to the other side of the mound to avoid Bobby V. when he left the field.  In terms of the bottom of the inning, we failed to score.  But it was not without further drama.

Ross ended the inning on a called strike; the at-bat featured seven pitches, all but one of them sliders, and the count had been full.  Ross and everyone else who had a pair of decently functioning eyes could see that that last supposed strike was actually a ball because it was low, and he let home plate umpire Alfonso Marquez know it immediately. So Marquez rejected him; it was only the second rejection in Ross’s career.  Several minutes later, Bobby V., who had separated Ross and Marquez, went back out there to have a talk with him that obviously got heated pretty quickly and was ejected for the sixth time this year, which sets the record for the most single-season ejections by any manager we’ve ever had in our long, illustrious history.  And at some point even third base coach Jerry Royster was ejected for some reason, so bench coach Tim Bogar was managing and coaching third at the same time at the end of it all.  The whole situation was just absurd and could have been neatly avoided had Marquez just done his job and saw reality.

Anyway, Miller and Padilla teamed up to shut out the Yanks in the top of the ninth, and the stage was set for another possible walkoff.  Salty’s leadoff at-bat was exactly the kind of at-bat you hope for most in those situations.  The count was full and he got an eighty-three mile-per-hour slide as his sixth pitch.  He’s a big guy, and he unleashed his formidable power on it and sent it out of the park to right field for a solo shot that only he could have powered out of the park.  We were now one run away with nobody out, and between Salty having made it look so easy and our last-minute heroics of the previous night, we were daring to believe that we could potentially pull it off again.

But we didn’t.  Nava flied out, Gomez grounded out, and Aviles reached on a fielding error.  Ellsbury could have put the whole thing away right then and there.  But he grounded out instead.

So we lost, 5-4.  But no one can say we didn’t put up a fight.  Because we did, both literally and figuratively.  We manufactured our own runs and pulled ourselves up by our bootstraps in the face of a deficit and dared to call a ball, a ball.  We just kept going at it all night long, but we came up just short in the end.  It’s just so infuriating.  I mean, I have to think that we’ve lost this way to plenty of other teams this year since clearly we’re in the business of losing every way to every other team this year, but to do it against the Yankees is particularly brutal.  We were almost there; we just needed one more run to tie it, and we could take care of them in extras.  And we couldn’t get it done.  It’s the story of our 2012 baseball lives.

On a more cheerful note, we have next year’s schedule, so assuming that we’re optimistic, it’s a reminder of something to look forward to.  The season starts for us on April 1 in the Bronx; we follow Opening Day with a day off and then conclude the three-game series.  We then head off to Toronto for three games, and then we head home for our home opener against Baltimore, which is followed by another day off.  We then finish our series with Baltimore and play the Rays before spending three games in Cleveland and going back home to face the Royals, A’s, and newly-AL Astros.  Then we have a day off and we go back to Toronto and then to Arlington, our first full series of May.  The Twins and Jays comprise another homestand, followed by a day off and another road trip against the Rays, Twins, and Other Sox.  Then back home we’ve got the Tribe and the Phillies, followed by a series at Philadelphia and then the Bronx, followed by a day off.  That takes us to June, our first full series of which is at home against the Rangers and then the Angels.  Then we head off to Toronto and Baltimore before another day off and coming home to face the Rays.  Then we head off to Detriot before another day off and another homestand featuring the Rockies, the Jays, a day off, and the Padres in July.  Then it’s off to the West Coast for the Angels, Mariners, and A’s before the All-Star break.  When play resumes, we host the Yanks and Rays before a trip to Baltimore and a day off.  The west then comes to us as we host the Mariners and D-Backs at home, which brings us to August.  We then travel to Houston and Kansas City before taking a day off and traveling to Toronto.  We host the Yanks at home after that, followed by a trip to San Francisco, a day off, a trip to Los Angeles for the Blue Sox, another day off, and then a homestand featuring the Orioles, Other Sox, and Tigers, which brings us to September.  We go to the Bronx after that, take a day off, go to Tampa Bay, and return home for the Yanks, a day off, the Orioles, the Jays, and another day off.  Then we go to Colorado for two games, take a day off, and go to Baltimore for the last series of the season.  So we’ve got at least three days off every month except one: May, our most packed month, when we only have one day off.  But it’s a good schedule.  It’s interesting that Interleague is sort of spread out this year instead of being clustered in June.  It’s often a tough schedule, and we have to play some worthy opponents, but if all goes according to plan, we’ll be able to hold our own next year.

AP Photo
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Doubront started out so well, but oh, how the mighty have fallen.  For almost all of the first half of the season, he was the ace on our staff, and given the Spring Training pitching roster, nobody would have predicted that.  And yet it was true.

Unfortunately, not so anymore.  Almost overnight, it seems, he started struggling.  At first it was easy to claim that he’d had a bad day and then that he was in a slump.  But being in a slump that lasts for several months and that you can’t get out of is a completely different story.  And that’s what we’ve got on our hands now, plain and simple.

Doubront gave up five runs on six hits over four innings.  He walked two, struck out four, threw eighty-four pitches, and took the loss.  His third pitch of the game was hit for a double, which turned into a run on a sac fly.  He then allowed a solo shot in the third and a two-run home run in the fourth.  He was replaced by Mortensen after his second pitch of the sixth inning was hit for a triple.

Mortensen then allowed his inherited runner to score on a single.  He had a beautiful if laborious sixth inning, during which he struck out all three of the batters he faced on a total of twenty pitches.  Carpenter pitched the seventh, and Hill pitched the eighth.  Bard appeared to pitch the ninth.  Both literally and figuratively.  As in, he made an appearance baseball-wise, and he made the appearance of pitching.  The appearance, and not the act, because he didn’t pitch well.  The field made a fantastic play to get an out at home, but with a runner already on base, he turned around and allowed a two-run home run the very next at-bat.

The offense eventually got around to fighting back.  We didn’t score until the fifth, so by the time we got on the board we were already down by five.  With one out, Kalish and Podsednik hit back-to-back singles, and Kalish scored on a groundout by Pedroia.  Pretty nondescript.  Ciriaco walked with one out in the seventh, stole second base, and scored on a bloop single by Gomez.  Also nondescript.  Pedroia, leading off the fifth, hit a 3-1 fastball clocked at ninety-five miles per hour out toward the Monster for a solo shot.  That was less nondescript.  It’s so much fun to watch him hit home runs and to uncork that massive swing that he seems to unleash out of nowhere.  With one out in the ninth, Aviles walked; one out later, he and Gomez were both coming home on Gomez’s two-run shot, also hit out toward the Monster, also powerful, also on his fifth pitch.  His count was 2-2, and his pitch was a seventy-seven mile-per-hour curveball.

So that makes the final score 7-5.  The sad thing is that this is a team that’s been underperforming just like we’ve been; we’re actually tied for last place with the Jays.  And we still lost by two.  So much for a fresh start at home.

The Boston Globe

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And we lost yet again.  After all, that is the theme of the season, and now that we have entered the last full month of the regular season, why break the theme now? Except this time we didn’t lose because our pitching was bad.  Our pitching was actually very good.  It was our hitters that completely shut it down.

Buchholz pitched seven innings.  He gave up four runs, only three earned, on six hits, while walking one and striking out eight.  So it was a solid, quality start.  He threw 109 pitches, seventy-two of which were strikes.  And he was the victim of the one bad inning.  How appropriate that he gave up all four of his runs in the fourth.  Before and after that he cruised; he had a one-two-three second, third, fifth, and seventh.  He had to contend with one baserunner in the first and two in the sixth, when he allowed his only walk.  So the fourth inning was really his only blemish, and it wasn’t even a huge, insurmountable blemish; four runs should be a surmountable sum, and most of the  time it is, but not when you’re playing like we’ve been playing and not when the offense produces nothing at all.

Buchholz began the inning by giving up a single and then hitting a batter.  Then he allowed three consecutive scoring plays: two RBI singles and a sac fly, which brought in another run thanks to a throwing error by Ellsbury that got away from Lavarnway at home.  A single put the runner at third, and then a fielding error by Iglesias on a force attempt prevented a double play and brought in the Mariners’ fourth run.

Hill and Chris Carpenter combined to pitch the eighth; combined, they issued three walks during that inning alone but managed to pitch around them.

Just as it was appropriate that the Mariners scored their four runs in the fourth, so too was it appropriate that we scored our one and only run in the first.  With two out, Pedroia doubled and scored on a single by Ross.

So the final score was 4-1.  That double was Pedroia’s thousandth hit.  Buchholz took an undeserved loss, because even though he squandered a one-run lead, the offense should have been able to come back and at least score three runs to tie it and put up some sort of fight in extras.  We are now in the midst of a seven-game losing streak and haven’t lost this many games in a row since 2001, when we had a losing streak of nine going.  It’s our eighth loss on the road, our longest streak since losing ten on the road going from the end of 2010 into the start of 2011.

AP Photo

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We finally made it! There are no more days to count, no more Spring Training games to play, no more side sessions to throw, and no more simulated games to complete.  There is nothing left.  It’s happening now.  Today is officially Opening Day, our first game of the regular season! As we all know, we’ll be playing the Tigers in Detroit, and Lester will be starting.  As we all know, this season is going to be interesting, to say the least.  Now, the wait is over.  The long, cold winter has come to an end.  The lineup: Ellsbury, Pedroia, Gonzalez, Papi, Youk, Sweeney, Ross, Salty, and Aviles, obviously in that order.  Baseball is finally here!

Ladies and gentlemen, we have our final two pitchers: Doubront and Bard, respectively.  Since Lester is a lefty, it wouldn’t have made sense to have Doubront be the fifth starter, since then you’d have two lefties starting back-to-back.  Anyway, are we surprised? No.  Should we be surprised? No.  Doubront had a phenomenal spring, and he’s had some experience starting in the Majors before, even if that experience wasn’t always the best.  As for Bard, you and I both know that Bobby V. wasn’t about to move him back to the bullpen after he declared that he was going to train him as a starter.  And that bothers me because unlike Doubront, who as I said had a phenomenal spring and who was therefore awarded a spot in the rotation based on explicit merit, Bard did not have a great spring and seems to have been awarded a spot in the rotation based on potential and possibility alone.  I’m not saying he won’t be a phenomenal starter; I’m saying that I have yet to see consistent glimmers of phenomenalness from him in that role.  Still, he’s shown that he can learn from his mistakes.  He probably picked up that skill while en route to becoming the next elite closer in the Major Leagues; oh, well.

Aceves had a fantastic spring also, and when he did have bad days, he rebounded nicely in his next outing, which is a critical quality for a starter.  At least we can count on him for solid long and middle relief.  And late relief, at least in the beginning, since Bailey will start the season on the disabled list with a thumb issue that will require surgery and that will make him stay on the disabled least until the All-Star break.  This is ridiculous.  He started last season on the disabled list with an arm injury, and he started Spring Training on the disabled list with a lat injury, and now he’ll start the beginning of the season on the disabled list with a thumb injury.  And don’t even get me started on the fact that we had to trade Josh Reddick to get Bailey in the first place.  So Aceves is in line to replace him, in case you were wondering.  Yeah, that gives us huge confidence in our new closer.

And as if that weren’t enough, Beckett apparently is having some sort of issue with his right thumb.  Apparently he’s had this issue for eighteen months.  He was examined and is fine to pitch now, but he said surgery could be inevitable at some point down the road.

In addition to actually knowing who are starters are going to be, we can be happy that Pedroia is healthy, Papi is in shape, and both Bobby V. and McClure have really connected with the team.  We can be unhappy about the fact that Crawford is still out and that Youk, Gonzalez, and Ellsbury haven’t hit a home run all spring.  And we will begin the season with nine guys on the DL.  Before the season even gets underway, we will have nine guys on the DL.  That’s just great.  As if we didn’t have enough to contend with during the start of this year’s season already.  Those nine guys account, in case you were curious, for $59.7 million.  And let’s not forget the fact that Chris Carpenter, the supposedly significant compensation that we were looking forward to receiving from the Cubs for Theo Epstein, is injured and has no command.  He is one of those nine.

Of course, you might say that at least that frees up some roster space.  And that’s true, but that’s only a plus if it’s used wisely.  The twenty-five-man Opening Day roster is carrying thirteen pitchers, which means that Bobby V. only has three backup bats on the bench, one of whom is a backup catcher.

We beat the Twins, 5-1, on Sunday.  Padilla and Atchison both appeared.  Sweeney singled, Ross and Aviles doubled, and Ellsbury tripled.  Since our record against Minnesota this spring has been four and two, we have won the Mayor’s Cup series, which began in 1993.  Since then, the Twins have won eleven series; we have won five of the last six.

We beat the Nationals, 4-2, on Monday.  Cook pitched five innings and gave up one run on two hits.  He walked one, struck out two, and threw forty-three of seventy pitches for strikes.  Padilla pitched the sixth.  Gonzalez and McDonald both singled, and Papi doubled.

We beat the Nationals, 8-7, on Tuesday.  Buchholz retired his first twelve hitters but also gave up a solo shot and a three-run home run.  All told, those four runs were his only runs; he gave up four hits in five and two-thirds innings.  He struck out five and walked none.  Bowden and Aceves both made appearances.  Pedroia went two for three with three RBIs, but the hero was Jason Repko, who ironically replaced Ellsbury and proceeded to hit a tie-breaking double and make a perfect throw home to secure the win.

In other news, the B’s beat the Rangers and Penguins.

Getty Images

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Pitchers and catchers officially reported on Sunday.  Fortunately, since we have a lot of badness to put behind us, most of our key pitchers were already down there, and that’s the way it should be.  The season isn’t going to win itself.  But we as Red Sox Nation can be ecstatic about that because it means that we’re one step closer to Spring Training, which is one step closer to the regular season, which is one step closer to having baseball return after a long winter and to putting last season behind us.

Compensation for Theo has officially been hammered out.  We’re getting Chris Carpenter – the prospect, not the Cy Young winner – and a player to be named later in exchange for a player to be named later.  Congratulations.  It only took four months to get this done.

Speaking of Theo, John Henry apologized to Crawford for stating on WEEI that he was against signing Crawford but did it anyway because Theo wanted to.  Crawford apparently apologized to John Henry for his horrendous season in return.  The brass also took ownership of last season’s collapse.  Well, apologies are all well and good, and it’s nice that people are owning up to things and being accountable, but we’ve got a new season on our hands that I think we should get to focusing on.

Rich Hill is on the roster.  Lackey is on the sixty-day DL.

In other news, the B’s were shut out by the Wild but bounced back with wins over the Blues and Sens; we also lost a shootout to the Sabres but at least we got a point out of it.

Boston Globe Staff/Jim Davis

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