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Posts Tagged ‘Bobby Valetine’

We’re seeing good things from the pitchers as well as the hitters this week.  Lester has a bit of a ways to go shaking the offseason rust off, but Beckett seems to be right on track.  Papi and Pedroia, among others, delivered at the plate this week as well.  We also made our first round of cuts, with no major surprises.  We saw some cases for the role of fifth starter, and we saw Bard hiccup in his latest step on the road to becoming a starter, which one American League scout seems to think is not the greatest of ideas.  Bobby V. also says he’s working with the pitchers to develop a new approach that incorporates a little more focus on the first-base runner in order to avoid the rampant running that we experienced last season.  All in all, it was a great week, and we’re starting to look like a team again.

We beat the Orioles, 6-1, on Sunday.  It was better than his previous outing, but still not what you expect from him.  In four innings, he threw sixty-six pitches and gave up one run and one hit and struck out two but walked four.  That’s never something you want to hear.  He bounced back, though, to retire seven of his last eight batters.  Shoppach caught him for the first time in seven years.  His cutter was really nice.  Pedroia went two for three with two RBIs, and Ross hit and scored twice each.  Cook, competing for the fifth spot in the rotation, delivered two scoreless frames.  His sinker was good.

We beat the Marlins, 5-3, on Monday, ironically on Beckett’s watch.  In total, he pitched four innings.  In total, he struck out three, gave up one run, one hit, and one walk and hit two batters.  But that doesn’t tell the whole story.  His first inning was horrible.  He hit both batters that inning; allowed that one hit, a double; and allowed one of his walks, which came with the bases loaded to allow his only run.  He threw twenty-one pitches that inning.  But he turned it around, and it was smooth sailing after that; he retired the last seven batters he faced and threw thirty-six pitches for the remainder of his outing.  Melacon delivered a perfect fifth; Bailey delivered a not-so-perfect sixth, giving up three straight hits and a run before finishing his work.  Ozzie Guillen received his first rejection as manager of the Florida Marlins.  That really didn’t take him long at all; honestly, I’m surprised it didn’t come sooner.  Finally, Pedro Ciriaco, a non-roster invitee to camp, blasted a two-run walkoff home run in the tenth inning to win it for us.

I don’t care if it’s the regular season, the postseason, or Spring Training; for me, beating the Yankees is always in season.  And that’s what we did on Tuesday.  By a score of 1-0.  Ciriaco again delivered; he singled to lead off the ninth and came home on two errors.  Doubront started and delivered four shutout innings during which he gave up two hits, walked one, balked one, and struck out three.  Forty-nine of his seventy-five pitches were strikes.  Obviously he threw way too many pitches, but what he was throwing looked good.  Bowden struck out three of his four batters and delivered a scoreless fifth.  Padilla also appeared and pitched three innings, striking out four.  Meanwhile, Buchholz started a simulation game and pitched four simulated innings; he walked two, struck out two, and gave up five hits, two of which were for extra bases.  He also picked off Punto.

The Cards beat us on Thursday, 9-6.  It wasn’t pretty.  Bobby V.’s statement that Bard’s been better was an understatement.  Bard was originally supposed to pitch four innings in relief, but he only lasted two and two-thirds innings.  He gave up seven runs on six hits, one of which was a home run.  He struck out four but also walked four.  There was also a sixteen-minute rain delay in the middle of his first inning, which supposedly wasn’t helpful either.  Meanwhile, Aceves started the game and actually delivered four full innings, and his four innings were awesome: one run on three hits, no walks, and four strikeouts.  McDonald and Pedroia each hit home runs, McDonald’s a two-runner and Pedroia’s a leadoff shot.  Papi and Lavarnway each hit doubles.

The Twins squeaked by us on Thursday, 2-1.  Lester was not good.  He threw eighty-one pitches in four innings.  Only forty-seven of those eighty-one pitches were strikes.  He hit two, walked one, struck out one, and gave up five hits, all of them to the last third of the order.  No control, no command, and no curveball.  Miller pitched a scoreless inning and struck out two; his two strikeouts came from the stretch, while a walk in the inning came from the windup.  Bobby V. told him to only pitch out of the stretch.  We’ll see how that works out.  Bailey bounced back to strike out two in a one-two-three inning.

We played two split-squad games against the Orioles yesterday.  We tied one at three and won the other, 7-4.  In the former, Cook pitched three and one-third innings and gave up a hit and a walk but struck out one and induced a double play.  In the latter, Beckett pitched a fine five innings; he gave up one run on two hits while walking one and striking out two.  Forty of his fifty-nine pitches were strikes.  Yup, that’s a mighty fine five innings.  Ross hit a home run in a full count.

In other news, the B’s lost to the Pens, Bolts, and Sens but beat the Flyers.

AP Photo
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